Videos and more about sepsis

 

Be part of the online World Sepsis Congress Spotlight on September 12th, 2017.

The Global Sepsis Alliance and the World Health Organization have joined forces to bring you this free online congress with the spot light on ‘Maternal and Neonatal Sepsis’. Register for free, please visit www.wscspotlight.org. For the program see here.

 

Read the resolution that was adapted by the WHA (World Health Assembly) in May 2017

You find the full text here.  Become a supporter of World Sepsis Day. To find out more and to register, visit www.world-sepsis-day.org

 

Read the Global Sepsis Alliance newsletter (published on the 11th of May 2017). 

On May 24th, the Global Sepsis Alliance, jointly with the German Ministry of Health and the International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations, hosted the ‘WHA Side Event on Sepsis’ in Geneva, see here.

The English book Sepsis and afterwards was released on September 2nd, 2016

 

You can use the orange button to order online

(see the white ordering section to the left or beneath).

If the ordering section doesn’t show because of your computer or cellphone settings, please use this direct link

What is this book about?

Sepsis and afterwards combines important information and stories from personal experience with the latest developments and insights. Physical and mental aspects are highlighted, together with practical tips including the so called Balance training. Sepsis and afterwards provides former patients and their relatives with a clear lead, and offers eye openers to professionals. A helpful guide, during hospital admission and after discharge. Recommended by the UK Sepsis Trust.

 

Dr. Ron Daniels (Chief Executive of the UK Sepsis Trust and the Global Sepsis Alliance) about the book: “It is certainly very comprehensive and well written! […] Some survivors may certainly benefit, particularly those who need a little more than our normal survivors’ booklet.” 

 

 

Important: if you would like to buy ‘Sepsis and afterwards’ but the payment method of your choice is not available, please send your mail, with subject ‘Book Sepsis and afterwards’ and your address details to: info@boekscout.nl and you’ll receive all necessary details for ordering and payment. 

Price: 18,50 € . Shipping costs outside the Netherlands (except for Belgium) are not included.

 

 

Sepsis deserves more attention. It is a severe and widespread illness. Unfortunately, most people are not familiar with sepsis and its impact is often underestimated.

(From the introduction) Idelette Nutma

Media attention

Take a look on the website of the Global Sepsis Alliance

Take a look on the website of the US Sepsis Alliance.

Take a look on the website of the UK Sepsis Trust, It recommends Sepsis and afterwards as ‘Additional support for sepsis survivors’.

 

Education for nurses, watch this video, created by the Sepsis Alliance: ‘Nurses Suspect Sepsis’ (May 2017)

 

 

 

The book Sepsis and afterwards was offered to the Global Sepsis Alliance council

On March 22nd, at the World Sepsis Day supporters meeting, Idelette Nutma offered the book Sepsis and afterwards to the Global Sepsis Alliance council. At this meeting representatives from many countries all over the world gave un update on developments regarding sepsis awareness in their country. 

From left to right: Simon Finfer (Australia, Treasurer), Flavia Machado (Brazil, Secretary), Konrad Reinhart (Germany, Chairman), Ron Daniels (UK, CEO) en Niranjan Kissoon (Vice chairman, Canada)
From left to right: Simon Finfer (Australia, Treasurer), Flavia Machado (Brazil, Secretary), Konrad Reinhart (Germany, Chairman), Ron Daniels (UK, CEO) en Niranjan Kissoon (Vice chairman, Canada)

 

 

 

To get an update on (global) activities and facts regarding sepsis: see the World Sepsis Day newsletter

Read more

 

MP Mike Wood survived sepsis, see the Birmingham mail. Watch this video about his comeback in the House of Commons as a grateful man. But he has a message. He urges Prime Minister Theresa May to take action to prevent unnessary deaths caused by sepsis.

 

Click here to go to the YouTube channel where you find all talks of the World Sepsis Congress

Over the course of two days and 13 sessions, 75 speakers from over 20 countries gave keynote speeches and presentations on all aspects of sepsis. 

 

The horrible and hidden faces of sepsis urge us to join forces!

On the occasion of the third sepsis symposium in the Netherlands, I was given the opportunity to give a talk. You can read the summary here. The symposium, held in Amsterdam (congress organizer ‘Interactie-opleidingen’)  brought together physicians, nurses, researchers and students from different countries in Europe. The program was composed by MD PhD Arthur van Zanten, Prof. Peter Pickkers and Prof. Armand Girbes. 

 

A personal story about sepsis, see this link

You can read my story, published on the site of the Sepsis Alliance in the US, here

 

The Extraordinary life of Alex Lewis, watch this video

 

 

Listen to more then 20 sepsis experts who shared their knowledge at the World Sepsis Congress, 8 and 9 September 2016!

Just click here.

Accessible to everyone!

Konrad Reinhart speaks about the Global impact of sepsis and summarizes, in a nut shell, everything you need to know about that. You can see the slides too. Have a look! 

 

 

Many survivors and their relatives face physical, mental and/or neuro cognitive problems after their critical illness and ICU admission, known as the Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS). 

Watch this lecture by Mark Mikkelsen. He’s an expert and his lecture gives a perfect overview:

The Road to Recovery: Engaging & Preparing Survivors of Critical Illness – Mark Mikkelsen

 

Recently (February 2016)  a new sepsis definition was completed

Watch this video, which explains it very clearly. And see here for an interview with professor Derek Angus, about the new sepsis-score called QSOFA. Especially for professionals this video is very informative.

 

Bloodpoisening/sepsis needs worldwide attention

 

Sepsis, also known as bloodpoisening, is responsible for many victims. It can start very sneaky, resembling a flue. That’s why sepsis often isn’t treated as an emergency. But early goal directed therapy can save so many lives. View this video called ‘It’s Sepsis – not Flue! Information for the public’:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When? If 2 or more of the following criteria arise: 
-Fever > 38,3 or undertemperature of 36 degrees Celsius or lower
-Hartbeat > 90/min
-Respiration rate > 20/min
-Strong deviatons in the rate and types of white bloodcell(counts)
ánd a strong suspicion of, or clue to infection. In that case the alarmbells for sepsis should start to ring. 

 

When signs of organ dysfunction occur (symptoms like: confusion, decrease in urineproduction or breathing difficulties) sepsis should be suspected. When all of this is complicated by a low bloodpressure which doesn’t react to administering extra fluids, then the situation has turned into a septic shock. Sepsis is one of the most common but least recognized diseases!

 

Early diagnosis of sepsis is essential

That’s why the Surviving Sepsis Campaign was initiated in 2002, a collaboration between the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, to bring down the mortality by severe sepsis and septic shock in the world. 

Read more here
Every year an International congress is held where professionals from countries all over the world share their knowledge and latest insights about (the treatment of) sepsis. Take a look here. And to enhance awareness the World Sepsis Day is held every year on the 13th of september. 

 

Possibilities

  • The book ‘Sepsis and afterwards. Use the orange button aboven. Otherwise click here. 
  • A consultation by mail or skype. Send a mail so we can make an appointment and I can give you the details.
  • Read here my lecture at the First International Sepsissymposium in the Netherlands (in English), in 2014.

Would you like to know more about sepsis, or share your comment or story?


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Tel: 06-41271004

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